Nurturing Growth Mindset

The Power of Yet

What is a growth mindset?

In the words of Carol Dweck, the scholar and author who came up with the concept: “Individuals who believe their talents can be developed (through hard work, good strategies, and input from others) have a growth mindset. They tend to achieve more than those with a more fixed mindset (those who believe their talents are innate gifts). This is because they worry less about looking smart and they put more energy into learning. When entire companies embrace a growth mindset, their employees report feeling far more empowered and committed; they also receive far greater organizational support for collaboration and innovation. In contrast, people at primarily fixed-mindset companies report more of only one thing: cheating and deception among employees, presumably to gain an advantage in the talent race.”

The concept of “Growth mindset” has captured the imagination of the corporate world, in large parts due to the attention brought to it by Microsoft. Four years ago, Satya Nadella took the helm at Microsoft. Under his leadership, the value of the company has tripled. The story of the culture and strategy refresh at Microsoft - is one inspired by Stanford professor Carol Dweck’s research on growth mindset. Under Nadella, the focus shifted from “Know it all to learn it all.”

How can teams adopt this remarkable mindset?

Nurturing Growth Mindset

As Benjamin Franklin had famously said, “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I learn. Involve me and I remember.” Hence the best way to bring a concept like this to life is to get participants involved and engaged through Experiential activities from the FocusU stable. The experience is then debriefed to make the concept come alive through the actual behaviors of the participants in the different activities.

A few targeted learning outcomes through this workshop are:
1) An appreciation of what “Growth mindset” is – as against “Fixed mindset”
2) Learning to identify fixed and growth mindset language
3) Responding to people when you hear fixed mindset language
4) Changing fixed or ambiguous statements into growth mindset statements
5) Appreciating that we all have both fixed and growth mindsets about different abilities/traits/skills. Hence there is always scope for improvement too.
6) Modelling the way for others through scripting a personal story about how having a growth mindset helped you accomplish something challenging

A few key parameters:



Is this workshop right for your team?

Since 2010 Dweck and three colleagues—Mary Murphy, Jennifer Chatman, and Laura Kray—have been exploring the effect of a growth mindset on organizations and their employees. The researchers conducted surveys to try to understand how the prevailing organizational mindset influenced workers’ satisfaction, perceptions of the organizational culture, levels of collaboration, innovation, and ethical behavior.

What they learned is that employees at companies with a fixed mindset often said that just a small handful of “star” workers were highly valued. The employees who reported this were less committed than employees at growth-mindset companies and didn’t think the company had their back. They worried about failing and so pursued fewer innovative projects. They regularly kept secrets, cut corners, and cheated to try to get ahead.

If you are keen on introducing your team to this powerful new concept, FocusU invites you to take the Nurturing Growth Mindset workshop!

Contact Us today - we will be glad to meet up and discuss the possibilities for your team!